Share + Give – Cats Advocates of Troy + Purrs in Piqua

This month’s Share + Give is all about cats – which are pretty much my everything. I love hanging out with my cats, talking about my cats, meeting other people’s cats, looking at pictures of cats on Instagram and watching funny cat videos on YouTube. While I love love love cats, I know that overpopulation is a serious problem. There are simply too many cats and not enough crazy cat ladies and gents (me and my husband included) to give them all homes. Always get your cat spayed or neutered, dear readers! If you need a vet in Miami County, I know a guy. 😉

Speaking of cats, Miami County, and cat overpopulation… did you know that Miami County is lucky enough to have not only one TNR organization in our community but two TNR organizations? TNR stands for Trap, Neuter, Return and is a way to control stray and feral cat populations. A female cat can have, on average, two to three litters of kittens a year. If each litter has 6 kittens and the female cat lives to be 10 or 11 years old, she could give birth to 120 to 180 kittens in her lifetime! That’s a really high number and that’s looking at one cat if we take into consideration the female cats of each litter also having 120 to 180 kittens in their lifetime the number gets even bigger and even more out of control. Spaying or neutering is the best way to control cat populations and TNR is the best way to control the population of stray and feral cats.

Purrs in Piqua, started by Tiffany Pontius in March 2015, is a group of volunteers who practice TNR in Piqua. Since April 2015 Purrs has neutered 250 cats, thus preventing thousands of unwanted kittens from being born on the streets of Piqua. Purrs has been able to raise over $7000 since September 2015. 90% of the money raised goes directly to veterinary fees.

Cat Advocates of Troy, founded by Felicia Watson in June 2016, is also a group of dedicated volunteers who practice TNR to control the population of stray and feral cats. In addition to getting cats spayed or neutered, the cats are vaccinated and ear tipped (in order to identify that they have been neutered). After the cats have time to recover, they are then returned to the area in which they were trapped.

I also have to point out how awesome these two organizations names and logos are – Purrs has an ear tipped cat for their logo and Cat Advocates of Troy, or CAT, has a cat in their logo which also spells CAT. It’s almost too purrrfect.

Purrs and CAT are both local organizations, so I’ve had the opportunity to interview both Tiffany and Felicia. In order to better highlight each of these organizations, I will be posting each interview separately later this week. So, you will get to learn more about two TNR organizations and see more pictures of cats. I might also finally remember how to spell neuter correctly… win-win-win.

Since I’m focusing on two organizations this month, I am splitting my donations, $15 towards Cat Advocates of Troy and $15 towards Purrs in Piqua.

Donate to Purrs in Piqua Here

Donate to Cat Advocates of Troy Here

 

I am making my donation in honor of:

  • Lori – my mom, who always talked my dad into keeping the kittens I brought home.
  • Michelle – my friend who loves cats so much she had allergy shots so she can have cats of her own, sans sniffles!
  • Anita – a family friend who shares my family’s love of cats, gardening, and a good bonfire.
  • Taylor – a fellow cat and coffee lover – I love sharing cat stories with Taylor while pulling shots of espresso at Winans!
  • Amanda – my first crazy cat lady internet crush – Amanda is an amazing advocate for women’s reproductive rights and has a bad-ass kitty named Boo Radley.
  • Patty – one of my WGS professors from Ohio University – I knew she was going to be one of my favorite professors when she started a lecture with pictures from I Can Has Cheezburger.

Happy Share + Give 2017!

If you feel like sharing the love by sharing this post on your social channels and/or by giving to Cats Advocates of Troy or Purrs in Piqua in honor of a friend or family member, please use the following hashtags in your post! You don’t have to donate to share the love, just re-tweet or share on FB or regram on Instagram! Let’s see how far we can Share + Give!

#shareandgive2017
#thisohiolife
#CatAdvocatesofOhio #PurrsinPiqua #tnr #trapneuterreturn #spayandneuter #straycat #feralcat

Columbus Metropolitan Library – #newmain

#newmain library cake

Libraries. Are. The. Best.

I love libraries! Some of my earliest memories are of going to the library for storytime or the summer reading program in Piqua. I love reading and the best place to get new material to read (or books to reread) is the library. Everywhere that I’ve lived I’ve had a library card. For me, that’s eight library cards!

For a wonderful period of eight glorious months – I worked at a library! ? Shout out to my favorite library ladies at the Miami Township Branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County – you rock! ?

#newmain media preview

Since I love libraries – I was stoked to be invited to the Media Preview of the re-opening of the Main Library of the Columbus Metropolitan Library! When I lived in Columbus I frequented this library and a few other branches often.

I started reading my #1 favorite series: The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith while a patron of the Columbus library. I also borrowed a ton of educational materials for work. I’d request as many books on a topic as I could find online, then wait for them all to arrive and go pick them up in one fell swoop. I’d almost instantly regret requesting that many books at once, though, because I had to carry them to my car and then up to my apartment or to my desk at work. #booknerdproblems

#newmain tour

The Media Preview was held last week, just a few days before the library’s grand reopening this past Saturday, June 25th. After a quick introduction, and a request to share our photos and tweets with the #newmain hashtag, we were off to tour!

We were split into groups based on different literature genres. I was in the poetry group with lots of other bloggers.

#newmain view topiary park

I liked the main library before the renovation – but post-renovation library is impressive. The new layout is bright and open to encourage a sense of community and togetherness.

Some of my favorite features of the library are the gorgeous vistas seen throughout the building. The new floor plan is so open – you can see across the atrium to other parts of the library from all floors and at many spots you can look from one end to the other and see downtown Columbus. There are also lovely views of the new park plaza which connects to Topiary Park.

Another favorite is the library’s focus on sustainability. They’re working to achieve LEED gold certification and will be able to use the building to teach sustainable practices to the Columbus community. Nature Smilies

There’s a big focus on technology and making it accessible to all library users. Each floor of the library, near the elevators and highlighted with bright orange walls (the only bright colors used in the building to make them stand out) are interactive discovery boards. The huge touchscreen boards can be used to find out what events are going on at the library and where meetings are being held. It can even help you find a new book to read! Expressive Smilies

#newmain views

My group kept getting held up at the many windows, since we were all bloggers we were all stopping for photos! There are so many nice spots to stop and enjoy the view!

#newmain tour group

An area of libraries that I love to visit are the local history and genealogy departments. I dabble in genealogy from time to time and I love learning about history, whether it’s history of my home town, where I live or when I’m travelling.

The genealogy and history department at the #newmain has some awesome new features: a digital lab (with one of the largest scanners in the US), a discovery board for local history and genealogy and an all digital microfilm with some full text searching! The department is a digital hub for Ohio libraries and institutes and is able to put scanned materials online.

#newmain genealogy

The Atrium, the center of the library, is also very open and well-lit. I imagine I could spend an entire afternoon perched on one of the many chairs along the railings on any floor, just watching people come and go.

#newmain atrium

The library has a new area for teens – the theme of openness and community togetherness continues in this part of the building too. Our library guide told us the computers are oriented so the teens using them face downtown Columbus. The hope is that this view will help teens imagine themselves working in one of the buildings downtown. Study areas overlook the board room, another aspirational view for teens.

#newmain teen area

The library is also making an effort to showcase their collection of books. Displays feature front facing books with stacks of the same title available behind them. I love this look! I know the old adage is that we shouldn’t judge books by their covers — but there are so many gorgeous book covers and they can really draw you in. I read so many books when I worked at the library (and took home more than I could ever read before they were due back) mostly because I saw all of these lovely books every day at work. One of my favorite things to do at work was come up with new ways to display our teen collection — the cover artwork makes a big difference in whether or not the book will be picked up! ?

#newmain children's area

A very noticeable change at the #newmain library is the children’s area. Called Ready for Kindergarten, this new set-up is meant to help preschoolers, parents and families get ready for kindergarten. The storytime areas, book shelves and play areas mimic a kindergarten classroom — there’s even a few classroom fish in a large tank built into a bookshelf! Animal Smilies

The children of Columbus are a top priority and the library is making sure that all building renovations reflect this commitment.

The Columbus Metropolitan Library is renovating or building 10 of their locations. You can read more about each project here.

#newmain lunch

After our tour, we were treated to a lunch buffet, catered by Two Caterers. We had a taco bar with beef, chicken, taco toppings, a corn salad and some sweet treats! It was all delicious and the little cupcakes were adorable!

#newmain cake

Lunch was delicious, but the fondant cake of #newmain really stole the show! The cake, made by Queen Anne’s Lace Cakes, was both the library and a stack of popular books. It was gorgeous and smelled so sweet! The cake wasn’t meant for eating, which is probably for the best — who would have wanted to cut up such a lovely creation?

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I’m so glad I was able to tour the #newmain Columbus Metropolitan Library last week! I was really impressed with the renovations and more than a little jealous that this library is no longer a short fifteen minute drive from home for me.

The #newmain library officially opened on Saturday, June 25th with a dedication and ribbon cutting at noon. In the afternoon there were activities, entertainment and patrons could sign up for a commemorative library card. The festivities concluded with a special PBJ & Jazz concert in Topiary Park featuring the Caribbean Jazz Sextet.

Now through August 27th, the Carnegie Gallery will feature an exhibit called art unbound. Local artists were challenged to transform worn library books that would have been recycled into works of art. I’m planning to stop in and see this awesome sounding exhibit later this summer.

To learn more about the library renovation and to see more photos, check out this article in The Columbus Dispatch: Main Library Reopening. And be sure to visit the library yourself!

#newmain view downtown

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Columbus Metropolitan Library
– Columbus

Address: 96 South Grant Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43215

Phone Number: 614-645-2275

Hours: Monday – Thursday 9am – 9pm. Friday – Saturday 9am – 6pm. Sunday 1pm – 5pm.

Social Media: Facebook, Instagram, PinterestTwitter, YouTube

Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden – Photoblog

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Kenneth and I were both lucky enough to be off work on the same weekday earlier this week so we decided to spend our day at the Cincinnati Zoo! We both hate crowds and wanted as much time in the sunshine before it got too warm outside so we arrived at the zoo as soon as it opened.

Our early morning trek was rewarded with a very quiet and peaceful zoo experience! We fed the giraffes, who share something in common with our cats (Emma especially) in that they love to lick everything! I asked one of the zoo staff who helped us feed the giraffes about it and her response was that “giraffes are weird.” Pretty much the same conclusion we’ve come to regarding Emma. 🙂 She did tell us that the giraffes may get a small amount of minerals from what they lick or that they like the textures, but they aren’t positive.

You can see my favorite photos below, including one of the gorgeous fossa. This lovely creature held my gaze for what felt like an eternity, but was probably a couple of minutes. It was one of several cool and intense moments I shared with zoo animals that day, including when the orangutan sat right up against the glass picking at his food while Kenneth and I watched (he seems to prefer the Cheerios in his snack mix) and a gecko (a Madagascar Giant Day Gecko to be exact) who threw himself at the glass of his aquarium just as I lowered my face to have a closer look at him. His efforts to be seen (or elicit a shocked scream/gurgle) gets him the honored spot as the featured photo of this post.

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ohio-120x120The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden

Address: 3400 Vine St. Cincinnati, Ohio 45220

Phone Number: 513-281-4700

Hours: The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is open every day of the year, except for Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Click here to view hours as they vary by month.

Admission: Children 2-12 and Seniors 62+ – $11. Ages 13 – 61 – $15.

Social Media: Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube

1950s: Building the American Dream – Ohio History Center

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There’s something oddly appealing to me about the 1940s and 1950s. I understand why I find the 1940s fascinating. It was an exciting time for women, despite the horrors of war. Middle class women went to work and filled roles they had never been permitted to fill before. The lack of young men available to work and the munitions and supplies needed overseas for the war created new opportunities and women working outside of the home was considered patriotic. I love reading books and watching television shows set during this tumultuous time. It’s so very different from my own life.

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I don’t really understand my fascination with the 1950s. This time period seems more old-fashioned, less exciting and more restrictive to women. The men who came home wanted their old jobs back and women (again, middle class women, lower class women had already been working to support their families) were scooted out of the factories and back into the kitchens. I consider myself a feminist to my very core, so I know this isn’t what I find appealing about this time period.

Maybe it’s the fashion I admire? Or perhaps I just like the image of a small ‘nuclear’ family gathered around a retro laminate top dining room table (like the one my husband and I own), enjoying a home cooked meal of tuna noodle casserole, three bean salad and Chex Mix. Mostly I think I just love history and imaging what life was like for people who lived before me or what the world was like when my grandparents were growing up.

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All of this, of course, is how I imagine the 1940s and 1950s to have been. I certainly wasn’t around then and books, television shows and talking with family can only tell you so much. I’d need a time machine to really know what it was like “back then.” Unfortunately, the Doctor hasn’t pulled me out of my regular life to go exploring all of time and space, but I have found a pretty decent substitute for a time machine to the 1950s.

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The Ohio History Center in Columbus has an awesome exhibit, 1950s: Building the American Dream. It’s as close to a time machine as I expect to find and is on view from July 2013 – 2018. The exhibit includes a full-size prefabricated Lustron house, which was built inside the museum. Lustron homes were enameled steel houses built after World War II in response to a house shortage after American soldiers returned home from the war.

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The Lustron at the Ohio History Center is set up as if a real 1950s central Ohio family were living there, a mother, father, a boy and baby girl. There are recipes in the kitchen with a KitchenAid mixer (made in Troy Ohio), newspapers and children’s books set out in the living room, clothes in the bedroom closets. Walking through the house and peeking in drawers feels a little like snooping and a lot like sleuthing. I enjoyed imagining what life was like in the steel home.

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The exhibit goes beyond the nostalgic and fun, examining the darker side of the 1950s. The exhibit focuses on three themes:

  • Family and Gender Roles: Traditional roles for men and women were redefined by the post-World War II boom and vastly different from previous and later generations.  
  • Social and Political issues: From segregated housing to the Civil Rights movement to the Cold War to McCarthyism, the 1950s was anything but ideal for so many Americans.    
  • Popular Culture: The popular music, literature, art, and design of the 1950s is undeniably alluring and retains devout followers 60+ years later.

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I love learning about history and visiting museums and the 1950s: Building the American Dream is definitely one of my favorites. I had a little extra fun with my photos from our visit, editing them in PicMonkey with Yester-color filter.

The 1950s exhibit is on view now through 2018 – plenty of time to check out the Lustron, a 1957 Chevy Bellaire, 1950s television news and programs and more!

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ohio-120x120Ohio History Center

Address: 800 East 17th Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43211

Phone Number: 800-686-6124, 614-297-2300

Hours: Wednesday – Saturday: 10 am – 5pm. Sunday: 12pm – 5pm.

Admission: Adults – $10. Ages 6–12 – $5. Ages 60+ – $9. Members and children under age 5 – Free. Parking is free.

Social Media: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube